spfw: têca

(images via ffw)

one of the things i most love about the brazilian fashion shows, i was just telling my friend, was the way in which we see so many different cultures melding together. i mean, to be sure, there are plenty of other countries and designers that explore a few, but truly, i’d say both são paulo fashion week and rio de janeiro’s fashion rio are among the best in terms of knowing we’re going to see some intriguing cultural cross-sections (kind of like thakoon was doing so well for a couple of seasons there–particularly like for a/w 2011 & s/s 2012).

anyway, as i’m sure you realize, that type of cultural…amalgamation, shall we say, was what was on offer at the s/s 2014 spfw show of one of my favourite brazilian brands, têca, showing that which was (in my opinion, at least, though i feel it counts for something, as we’ve been following the house quite closely a good number of seasons now–see s/s 2011, a/w 2011, s/s 2012, s/s 2013, a/w 2013) one of their best works yet (or at least, in recent seasons), and doing that which they do so well in terms of mixing up some otherwise rather unexpected cultural attributes.

this time around, the idea manifested as a mashup of chinese and portuguese elements, the brazilian site pure trend explains (trans.): “Inspired by the work of the Chinese artist Li Xiaofeng, who creates works of art in the form of garments constructed from broken china, the designer Helô Rocha used crockery and Chinese vases and Portuguese tiles as a reference, which influence the stamping of the collection and also in the colour chart, which, besides the shades of blue, is dominated by white and black.”

i was a little reminded of raf simons’ a/w 2009 collection for jil sander, which was inspired by the french ceramicist pol chambost, not necessarily in aesthetic, but more in vibe, in that neither was blatant in their inspirational execution, and ultimately, it lead to something delicate and quite lovely. the brazilian site chic gloria kalil related that the motifs appeared as (trans.) “Richelieu embroidery cut into the blue and white tile pattern,” while i also found myself quite agreeing with them as they argued that we’re seeing a new, more grown-up version of têca, with the lighthearted and flippy little girlish girl left behind (perhaps with the move from fashion rio to spfw).

ah, well. anyway, as elle reflected that the clothes were replete (trans.) “with arabesques and damask details in very fine cotton fabrics. Almost rustic metal belts [were employed] to break the romance that permeates the entire collection,” we heard ffw weighing in that floral motifs came through quite strongly, while (trans.) “(t)here are also shorts, coats and jackets, but the strong even with transparencies which are long, fluid, flowing, which made the girls dream of this summer.”  and indeed, the sort of french-ified little black-and-white stripes also made me think of all the maritime motifs which have been circulating but everywhere this spring.

then, finally, it seems like the right thing to do, as ever, to end on the thoughts of the excellent brazilian site closet online, yes? so, according them them (trans.), “(i)nspired by Portuguese tiles, the rich collection came in flowing dresses. The forms were very feminine and with the freshness of summer. Long, floaty, low waists, flared skirts, ruffles, spaghetti straps and low necklines on both the back and neck. All this is very delicate, sexy and nothing ordinary. Fabrics such as voile, linen, silk and cotton were present. Embroidery completed the super rich beautiful parade.”

(enjoy the fashion show video here)

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