paris fashion week: issey miyake

(images via vogue)

i don’t think it really matters (well, i should qualify: it hasn’t mattered to me, thus far) which designer takes over the reigns at issey miyake, because even as i account for the part in which i acknowledge that i try to keep an open mind and not have biases towards particular labels, i’ve basically loved each and every collection opt has reviewed that they’ve put out (see a/w 2010, s/s 2011, a/w 2011, s/s 2012, resort 2013, s/s 2013, pre-fall 2013), and if i’m honest and admit that designer yoshiyuki miyamae’s paris fashion week work for the a/w 2013 season wasn’t my favourite i’ve seen from the house yet, there were still enough good looks to keep me enraptured at least until next season rolls around.

anyway, although we oftentimes face quite a lot of radio silence on the part of the critics, this time around they had much more to say, so we’ll start straight off lest we run out of room! and so, wwd noted that “(t)hough the program notes stated the collection was inspired by ‘the patterns and colors of landscapes as seen from the sky,’ Miyamae appeared to have taken the opposite approach, putting plaid patterns under the microscope to blow up the fabric details into minimalist color blocks and diagonal grids. Standouts included a terrific selection of outerwear, from a wool and angora coat in a deep blue to a hot-pink checked trench made from a high-tech reversible bonded fabric.”

and fashionologie described how “(t)he designer, seemingly inspired by the Scottish Highlands, fused tartan, houndstooth, and the Prince of Wales check that so many of his compatriots have used this season together, then blew them up into oversize prints and filtered them through a technicolor palette of bright blue, pink, orange, and green. Black and gray made appearances, notably in a fur coat and a check coat with black piping, but perhaps the most interesting pieces were the colorful trousers with bites of houndstooth hidden in the pleats.”

“In an interesting take on tartan, Miyamae blew up the scale of the checks for an intriguingly choppy effect on pieces like an emerald green check top with a high mandarin-style collar, paired with check emerald green and sky blue pants,” explained fashion week daily. “Also exhibiting the tweaked take on tartan: a hot pink asymmetrical, collared coat with a mix ‘n’ match tartan pattern. The brand’s famous Pleats Please dresses came in azure blue and vibrant red checks paired with furry arm warmers and dresses like a blanket-esque, angularly cut cherry and black frock that would be cheerfully at home in the Scottish Highlands.”

In an interesting take on tartan, Miyamae blew up the scale of the checks for an intriguingly choppy effect on pieces like an emerald green check top with a high mandarin-style collar, paired with check emerald green and sky blue pants. Also exhibiting the tweaked take on tartan: a hot pink asymmetrical, collared coat with a mix ‘n’ match tartan pattern. The brand’s famous Pleats Please dresses came in azure blue and vibrant red checks paired with furry arm warmers and dresses like a blanket-esque, angularly cut cherry and black frock that would be cheerfully at home in the Scottish Highlands.

– See more at: http://www.fashionweekdaily.com/the-fix/article/paris-fall-2013-issey-miyake#sthash.uAp29IrL.dpuf

In an interesting take on tartan, Miyamae blew up the scale of the checks for an intriguingly choppy effect on pieces like an emerald green check top with a high mandarin-style collar, paired with check emerald green and sky blue pants. Also exhibiting the tweaked take on tartan: a hot pink asymmetrical, collared coat with a mix ‘n’ match tartan pattern. The brand’s famous Pleats Please dresses came in azure blue and vibrant red checks paired with furry arm warmers and dresses like a blanket-esque, angularly cut cherry and black frock that would be cheerfully at home in the Scottish Highlands.

– See more at: http://www.fashionweekdaily.com/the-fix/article/paris-fall-2013-issey-miyake#sthash.uAp29IrL.dpuf

In an interesting take on tartan, Miyamae blew up the scale of the checks for an intriguingly choppy effect on pieces like an emerald green check top with a high mandarin-style collar, paired with check emerald green and sky blue pants. Also exhibiting the tweaked take on tartan: a hot pink asymmetrical, collared coat with a mix ‘n’ match tartan pattern. The brand’s famous Pleats Please dresses came in azure blue and vibrant red checks paired with furry arm warmers and dresses like a blanket-esque, angularly cut cherry and black frock that would be cheerfully at home in the Scottish Highlands.

– See more at: http://www.fashionweekdaily.com/the-fix/article/paris-fall-2013-issey-miyake#sthash.uAp29IrL.dpuf

then, the irish times cut in that, of the day, “the unexpected highlight was the Issey Miyake show, a joyous highland fling in which abstracted motifs of familiar Scottish tartans and plaids had as much verve as the accompanying reels and jigs manipulated into new musical sounds by the Japanese group Open Reel Ensemble. From the opening Prince of Wales check suits and boyish coats trimmed with candy stripes to the billowing dresses at the finale, the overall effect of this imaginative romp was fluidity and playfulness with enormous commercial and aesthetic appeal.”

and according to elle, “the collection was an abstracted version of a highland fling: plaids were pixelated and pleated, traditional colours were played with, tartans were given a new lease of life.A warm ochre suit had the collar popped to reveal a burst of technicolor tartan underneath; wide silk trousers split to the hip to show more billowing tartan; girls walked down two by two in neat little mannish shirt and trouser combos that were colour-blocked like blown up family plaids. The pleats made their appearance in light asymmetric shift dresses splashed with – you guessed it – electrified tartan.”

and elsewhere, the washington post related that “(o)ptical crisscrosses of varying thickness created great dynamic movements on stretch fabric, as he imagined an aerial view of a dense forest. Colors of the ‘80s such as rich ultramarine, vivid jade and vermilion evoked the hues. ‘What you see from a plane … when sunshine lights up the land,’ Miyamae said. That made for some beautiful knee-length coats. Not all of the 42 looks worked. Some came across as busy, especially toward the end, when faux-fur was added to the repertoire. But the mastery of tonal color really stole the show.”

“you hardly needed to be a topographer—or a Celtic specialist—to appreciate a collection that was more straightforward than usual,” style announced. “The signposted fabric innovation this time was ‘hollow fiber’—like macaroni, apparently, but woven into a cloth that was both warm and light for shapely jackets. They were paired with the voluminous skirtlike pants that were a key item. Those came slashed open to reveal checks or stripes, or matched to body-conscious roll-necks for a look that combined past and future in a winning illustration of the blend of tradition and technology that helps Issey Miyake stand alone.”

then, finally, the iht‘s suzy menkes stated that “this was one of those rare shows where the designer Yoshiyuki Miyamae — himself young enough to run out at breakneck speed at the end — had the models looking happy. What a surprise in current fashion! But why wouldn’t they be pleased to be wearing bold coats and jackets, woven from three different yarns, the sporty clothes either in plain colors or more probably in vivid checks or versions of plaid….Mr. Miyamae has brought a youthful energy to Issey Miyake without losing the sense of invention so vital to the house. What he called ‘a shadowy interaction between fabric and landscape’ was a poetic way of saying these are more than just clothes.”

(watch the catwalk finale video here)

https://oneporktaco.wordpress.com/2012/08/29/issey-miyake-resort-2013/

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